Campbell Live on zero-hour contracts

Continuing my commemoration of Campbell Live’s commitment to serious investigative reporting of New Zealand current affairs, instead of watching goddamned Road Cops. Tonight: remembering how John Campbell and the team put a spotlight zero-hour contracts and helped push the government to promise change.

Zero-hour contracts leave Kiwi families struggling

The minimum wage in New Zealand is $14.25 per hour, which really isn’t a lot.

Campbell Live has always advocated for higher worker wages – we support the living wage and the employers who offer it.

Today, a new living wage was announced – it’s now $19.25. It’s the amount per hour an employee needs to earn to keep their head above water.

But there’s an entire industry in New Zealand paying minimum wage and less, because the workers they employ don’t even work a full week.

It’s called a zero-hour contract, and as an employee, you are called upon to work whenever required. That means if you’re not required, you don’t get paid that week – so how do these people survive?

Check out Campbell Live’s coverage of the GCSB and Kim Dotcom stories on the TV3 website, while we still can.

Campbell Live on Gloriavale

Continuing my commemoration of Campbell Live’s commitment to serious investigative reporting of New Zealand current affairs, instead of watching goddamned Road Cops. Tonight: in memory of the amazing coverage of Gloriavale, New Zealand’s very own creepy, abusive cult.

Gloriavale: Life inside the compound

She spent the first 19 years of her life inside Gloriavale before escaping, leaving behind six brothers and two sisters.

Tonight, for the first time, Julia shares her story of life inside the compound.

Check out the full Gloriavale reports on the TV3 website, while we still can.

Campbell Live on the GCSB

Continuing my commemoration of Campbell Live’s commitment to serious investigative reporting of New Zealand current affairs, instead of watching goddamned Road Cops. Tonight: honouring a current affairs show which bothered to unpack the murky and complex world of government surveillance.

Dissecting the GCSB bill

In short, the GCSB bill allows the organisation to spy on New Zealanders and to pass what they learn on to foreign governments.

“If you don’t do anything wrong, you have nothing to hide” is a common response to criticism of such unprecedented power.

But the SIS can already spy on New Zealanders and so can the police.

The GCSB bill connects domestic spying to global spy networks, which, as we’ve recently learnt, are listening to almost everyone.

Now, the bill is being passed under urgency.

But why? Shouldn’t we get this right?

Check out Campbell Live’s coverage of the GCSB and Kim Dotcom stories on the TV3 website, while we still can.

Campbell Live on the Christchurch quake recovery

Continuing my commemoration of Campbell Live’s commitment to serious investigative reporting of New Zealand current affairs, instead of watching goddamned Road Cops. Tonight: here’s to John and his team’s unwavering dedication to the people of Christchurch.

From 2012:

Christchurch caravan – a year on

A year ago we introduced our caravan of complaint to Christchurch.

It was an opportunity for people to talk freely about their struggles dealing with the aftermath of the quakes.

Hundreds turned up, almost all speaking with a passion rarely seen on TV, and a lot of them talking about EQC.

But a year on, how are they doing?

From just over a week ago:

Two years on in Christchurch: Are things resolved?

Two years ago this week, Campbell Live held a caravan in Christchurch – it was our way of simply letting people tell their own stories.

We saw people at the end of their tether, people who’d hit the wall and had had enough and people breaking down.

Two years on, how are those fellow New Zealanders now?

Campbell Live reporter Jendy Harper picked six of them and went back to find out.

Check out the full reports on the TV3 website, while we still can.

Campbell Live on poverty and school lunches

We said farewell to Campbell Live last week, and from tonight TV3 is delighting our screens with Road Cops in its place, presumably until their shiny new co-hosted totally-what-the-audience-wants current affairs show is ready to launch.

While Road Cops may involve some really gripping, in-depth reportage, I thought I’d head over to TV3’s website, where – for the time being, at least – you can still watch John and the team doing what they did best.

Here’s to you, Campbell Live, and here’s to your heartbreaking story about poverty and kids’ school lunchboxes.

Lunchbox differences in decile 1 and decile 10 schools

Childhood poverty increases the risk of poor health, poor educational achievement, unemployment, teenage pregnancy, criminality and so on.

Addressing it would not only enrich the lives of the children concerned, it would reduce the money we’re spending responding to those issues.

To illustrate the impact of child poverty, we’ve conducted a simple experiment.

Without any advance notice, we asked kids in a decile 10 school, and a decile one school, to show us what they’re having for lunch.

See the full video here.