Do Good Thursday: End solitary confinement

People Against Prisons Aotearoa (formerly No Pride in Prisons) are campaigning to end solitary confinement in New Zealand prisons – or as Corrections insists on referring to it in the most Orwellian way possible, “directed segration”.

PAPA says:

Every year, thousands of New Zealand’s prisoners are put in solitary confinement. This means they are forcibly isolated from meaningful human contact for 22 to 24 hours a day. In many cases, they are not even given access to natural light or fresh air for 23 hours a day. Some cells have nothing in them other than a thin mattress on a concrete slab, and a cardboard box to pee in.

Often, the Department of Corrections will use solitary confinement in the name of prisoner management, health, and safety. But in reality, people who are exposed to these horrible conditions, especially for long periods of time, come out of them with irreparable mental and physical damage. Rather than promoting wellness and good order in the prison, it increases the risk that prisoners will hurt themselves and others.

Removing people against their will from all human contact, and other basic human needs, is degrading and dehumanising. There is no excuse for the cramped, barren, monotonous, and miserable environment that Corrections forces on thousands of people a year. It’s time to demand the end of solitary confinement in New Zealand prisons once and for all.

Sign the petition here.

Find out more about PAPA’s work here. Prison abolition can sound very scary to comfortable middle-class types, but once you wrap your head around the genuine harm done by the prison system, and the possibilities of dealing with crime and violence in ways which, you know, don’t perpetuate crime and violence, it starts making an even scarier amount of sense.

What do you reckon?

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